Nominations Open for AoIR Executive Committee

AoIR is now seeking your nominations for the new Executive Committee to take office in October of this year and serve until October 2019.

Below, you will find: A. Time frame of the election. B. Description of the AoIR governance system and of the elected positions. C. Nominations and Elections Processes. And D. Questions for Candidates.

A. Time Frame of the Election:
1. Call for Nominations: opens March 20, 2017 and will remain open for fifteen (15) days.
2. Nominations close for all positions April 3, 2017.
3. Candidates will be listed on aoir.org and further information will be made available on our membership system, where discussion forums will let you ask questions of the candidates.
4. Voting begins April 24, 2017 at our online balloting site and will remain open for ten (10) days. (Details for accessing this site will be sent in a later message through our membership system.)
5. Voting ends May 3, 2017, expiring at 12:00 noon, U.S. Eastern Time in the State of Delaware.
Election results will be announced on air-l. The new committee is formally introduced and assumes its duties during the AoIR conference in Tartu, 18-21 October 2017.
More information can be found in the AoIR Bylaws:

Bylaws

Candidates should familiarize themselves with the duties laid out in the Bylaws. I also encourage persons interested in running for a specific position to contact me or any of the current office-holder(s) with any questions.

B. AoIR Governance and Description of Elected Positions:
The organizational structure of AoIR is simple. There are 5 officers (President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Graduate Student representative). The 9-member Executive Committee consists of these officers, plus the Past President and 3 open seat representatives. Elected officials hold their positions for two years. After two years, the Vice President becomes President. Nominations are invited for Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, Graduate Student representative, and 3 open seats. You may nominate yourself or someone else you think would do a good job. Details on the nomination procedure follow below.
Duties of the President: Article 4/Section 6 of AoIR’s bylaws.
Duties of the VP/President-Elect: Article 4/Section 7 of AoIR’s bylaws
Duties of the Secretary: Article 4/Section 8 of AoIR’s bylaws
Duties of the Treasurer: Article 4/Section 9 of AoIR’s bylaws
Duties of the Graduate Student Representative: Article 4/Section 10 of AoIR’s bylaws
Duties of Open Seat Directors: Represent the membership of AoIR, and contribute to decision-making.

C. Nominations and Elections Processes.
Only a member of AoIR can run for a position, nominated by anyone. If nominated for more than one position, a nominee must choose to run for one (and only one) position in this election. You may nominate yourself or another person (or people). If nominating someone else, confirm with that person that they are willing to run.

Self Nominations: Email AoIR Association Coordinator Michelle at <ac at aoir dot org> and indicate the position for which you are nominating yourself. Please provide in your nomination email a short candidate statement addressing the questions below.

Nominating Others: Email AoIR Association Coordinator Michelle at <ac at aoir dot org> with the name of the person you want to nominate, the position for which you are nominating this person, contact information for that person, and an indication of whether you know if this person would accept this nomination. (If you don’t know, we’ll contact them and ask).

All candidates for election will be required to provide answers to the questions listed belowl, have the answers posted to the AoIR election forum website, and participate in an online candidate forum.

In addition the Graduate Student candidates must confirm in their response that they comply with the by-laws: The Graduate Student Representative must be actively enrolled in a degree program at the time of nomination and election.

The voting system used by AoIR is one vote per member for each of the positions for election listed above. Votes will be tallied using a balloting software site. In the case of the four directly elected officers, the candidate with the highest number of votes shall be declared the winner; in the case of the open seats, the three candidates with the highest, second-highest and third highest votes shall be declared the winners of the open seats.
In the case of tied results for the officer positions, the winner shall be determined by the ballot counters, by drawing of lots, using a method that ensures each of the tying candidates has an equal chance of success and witnessed by at least 1 person independent of the association. In the case of tied results for the open seat positions, the drawing of lots shall be used only when there are more tied candidates than seats available.

D. Questions for Candidates (these questions must be answered in your nomination email):
1. What are your qualifications for this position (including prior experience and participation in AoIR)?
2. Please describe two or three short-term goals you would like to achieve through membership on the executive (including a rationale for each and how you would contribute to their achievement).
3. What is your long-term vision for AoIR?
4. What else should voters consider when deciding whether or not to vote for you?
In answering the questions, please be concise and give information specific to the position for which you are nominating and which will permit voters to assess your case for election to that position.

Posted in Administrative, Elections

2017 Dissertation Award Nominations

The Association of Internet Researchers calls for submissions for the 2017 AoIR Dissertation Award. To be eligible for the AoIR Dissertation Award, a PhD dissertation in the area of internet research must have been filed in the 2016 calendar year. Nominations (self and other) must be received by 15 April 2017. All methods and disciplines are welcome.

Submissions Details:
– A nomination letter that explains why the dissertation is deserving of the award
– How it contributes to internet research
– A PDF copy of the dissertation should be emailed
– The graduate or their supervisor must be a member of AoIR
– Self-nominations are permitted
– Filed in 2016 (meaning fully defended, all edits complete, filed/published with a 2016 copyright)

The recipient of this award will be announced this summer. In addition to winning a cash prize, the individual will also be invited to present their research in a session at AoIR 2017 in Tartu, Estonia, 18-21 October 2017.

The committee this year is comprised of Jeremy Hunsinger, Daren Brabham, Jill Rettberg Walker, Tim Highfield and chaired by Mathias Klang.

For any questions please contact Mathias Klang dissertationaward at aoir dot org or Jenny Stromer-Galley prez at aoir dot org

Posted in Awards, Conferences

2017 AoIR Nancy Baym Book Award Nomination

We are pleased to call for nominations for the Nancy Baym Annual Book Award. Named after former Association of Internet Researchers (AoIR) president Nancy Baym, this award recognizes the best scholarship of AoIR and highlights the breadth of work relating to the sociocultural dimensions of networked media. We will accept nominations from AoIR members for books they found of great scholarly value and wish to champion. The books will be reviewed by a committee of Nancy Baym, Kate O’Riordan and chaired by Eugenia Siapera.

To be eligible for the award:

  • The book must be authored or co-authored as a monograph and must explore a single topic (edited collections are not eligible).
  • All of the book’s authors must be current members of AoIR at the time of submission (April 15, 2017).
  • Memberships may be purchased at https://aoir.org/membership/.
    The book must have been published between January 1 and December 31, 2016.

Each book should be accompanied by an emailed letter of nomination. Self-nominations from AoIR members are welcome. The letter of nomination, which must be written by a current member of AoIR, should outline:

  • How the book contributes to AoIR’s intellectual community.
  • The book’s unique contributions and overall strengths.
  • If not a self-nomination, the letter should also include a statement that the nominated author has been contacted prior to its submission and accepts the nomination.

Books submitted without a meaningful nomination letter outlining both the strengths of the book and the book’s contribution to the AoIR community to AoIR will not be eligible.
Nomination letters and book copies in either digital or hard copy should arrive no later than April 15, 2017.

If digital, please provide access to BookAward@aoir.org.

Please indicate in the subject line: “AoIR Nancy Baym Book Award Submission.”
Hard copies (1 each) should be mailed to:

Eugenia Siapera
School of Communications,
Dublin City University
Collins Avenue,
Glasnevin, Dublin
Ireland
Kate O’Riordan
Director of Teaching and Learning
Media Film and Music
Silverstone Building 330
University of Sussex
Falmer
BN1 9RG
UK

Nancy Baym
Microsoft, 12th Floor
1 Memorial Dr.
Cambridge MA 02142 USA

The winner of the award will be announced in June 2017. In addition to winning a cash prize, the individual will also be invited to present during a panel session on the winning book at the AoIR conference in Tartu, Estonia, in October 2017.

Please contact Eugenia Siapera (BookAward@aoir.org) or Jenny Stromer-Galley (prez@aoir.org) if you have any questions about this process.

Posted in Awards, Conferences

A Statement from the Members of the AoIR Executive Committee

In light of the United States’ January 27, 2017 executive order restricting entry to its borders, based upon intersectional stereotypes of Islamic religious faith as embodied within Middle Eastern, African, and South Asian identity, we hereby restate our commitment to the fundamental values upon which the Association of Internet Researchers (AoIR) is founded. These values center upon human dignity, equality of opportunity, and the principles of academic freedom.  AoIR vehemently opposes any entities, groups, measures, or activities that seek to undermine such principles, in scholarly research and in society at large, wherever in the world they may operate.

AoIR, following its mission to provide and promote outstanding research upon the Internet’s capacity to mediate transnational and global culture through networking, is proud to represent a diverse international community of Internet researchers. In affirming the shared values of our community, we encourage our members to exercise their inalienable right to speak out whenever and wherever they believe those values to be undermined or violated. In keeping with the principle of academic freedom, AoIR conferences themselves also support that free exercise by offering a venue for such discussions to be conducted respectfully.

AoIR is constantly at work to ensure that our actions and our words are in sync. Therefore, we proudly state that we do not tolerate or create any undue barriers to the full and equal participation of its members because of race, age, culture, ability, ethnicity or nationality, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, marital status, religious affiliation, or socioeconomic status. This commitment means, in particular, that we will endeavor to not stage future conferences in locations where such participation cannot be guaranteed. As an organization, AoIR stands ready to support any colleague who may be directly or indirectly affected by this order.

Members of the Executive Committee:

André Brock
Axel Bruns
Jenny Korn
Annette Markham
Adrienne Massanari
Susanna Paasonen
Kelly Quinn
Jennifer Stromer-Galley

P.S.: Our full Statement of Principles and Statement of Inclusivity can be found here: https://aoir.org/diversity-and-inclusivity/

Posted in Administrative, Community, Miscellaneous

2017 Nancy Baym Book Award & Dissertation Award

The Association of Internet Researchers has made slight changes to the submission criteria for both the Nancy Baym Book Award and the Dissertation Award. Specific details on how to submit is forthcoming.

Nancy Baym Book Award

The Nancy Baym Annual Book Award seeks to recognize the best work in the field of Internet Studies. In doing so, the award helps to highlight the breadth of work that is done relating to the social and cultural dimensions of networked media. The award includes a cash prize and an invitation to present the work at the annual IR conference.

To be eligible for the award:

  1. The book must be authored or co-authored as a monograph and must explore a single topic (edited collections are not eligible).
  2. All of the book’s authors must be current members of AoIR at the time of submission (April 15, 2017). Memberships may be purchased here.
  3. The book must have been published between January 1 and December 31, 2016.

Each book should be accompanied by an emailed letter of nomination. Self-nominations from AoIR members are welcome. The letter of nomination, which must be written by a current member of AoIR, should outline:

  • How the book contributes to AoIR’s intellectual community.
  • The book’s unique contributions and overall strengths.
  • If not a self-nomination, the letter should also include a statement that the nominated author has been contacted prior to its submission and accepts the nomination.

Books submitted without a meaningful nomination letter outlining both the strengths of the book and the book’s contribution to the AoIR community to AoIR will not be eligible.

Dissertation Award

The Association of Internet Researchers Dissertation Award was established in 2012 to recognize the work of emerging scholars in the field of Internet research.

Submissions Details:

  • A nomination letter that explains why the dissertation is deserving of the award
  • How it contributes to internet research
  • A PDF copy of the dissertation should be emailed
  • The graduate or their supervisor must be a member of AoIR as of date of submission (April 15, 2017).
  • Self-nominations are permitted
  • Filed in 2016 (meaning fully defended, all edits complete, filed/published with a 2016 copyright)

The recipient of this award will be announced in the summer. In addition to winning a cash prize, the individual will also be invited to present their research in a session at AoIR 2017 in Tartu, Estonia, 18-21 October 2017.

Posted in Awards, Conferences

Jonathan Gray’s #AoIR2016 Presentation: Reshaping Data Worlds for AoIR 2016

Reshaping Data Worlds for AoIR 2016

By jwyg | Originally Published: October 5, 2016

The following is a short video on Reshaping Data Worlds prepared for the 17th annual meeting of the Association of Internet Researchers – AoIR 2016 on “Internet Rules!” – which takes place in Berlin on 5-8th October 2016. It is part of a session on Big Data Meet Grassroots Activism organised by the DATACTIVE project.

 

Reshaping Data Worlds? from Jonathan Gray on Vimeo.

Original post and full video transcript available here.

Interested in more content like this? Join us for #AoIR2017 in Tartu, Estona! Submissions now open!

Posted in Uncategorized

#AoIR2017 Keynote Speakers ~ We have 2 this year!!

We are doubly thrilled to announce the two keynote speakers at #AoIR2017 in Tartu Estonia.

Keynote #1: Andrew Chadwick

Andrew Chadwick (PhD, London School of Economics) is Professor of Political Science in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Royal Holloway, University of London, where he founded the New Political Communication Unit in 2007. His latest book is The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), which won the 2016 International Journal of Press/Politics Book Award for an outstanding book on media and politics published in the previous ten years, and the American Political Science Association Information Technology and Politics Section Best Book Award, 2014. His book Internet Politics: States, Citizens, and New Communication Technologies (Oxford University Press, 2006) won the American Sociological Association Best Book Award (Communication and Information Technologies Section) and is among the most widely-cited works in its field. Andrew is also Editor of the book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics, which currently features 20 titles. At Royal Holloway, by whom he has been awarded two Teaching Excellence Prizes, he teaches courses on the internet and politics, digital political communication, and the politics of democracy. Andrew is currently writing his next book, Social Media and the Future of Democracy (Oxford University Press). You can visit his website and follow him on Twitter.

 

Keynote #2: Marju Lauristin

Marju Lauristin is a Professor of Social Communication at the Institute of Social Studies at the University of Tartu (since 1995). Her main research interest covers social and cultural transformations on the way from post-communist to information society.

Prof. Lauristin was one of the establishing members of ‘Rahvarinne’ in 1988, the first large-scale independent political movement in Estonia since the beginning of the Soviet occupation. She has since been Chairman of the Estonian Social Democratic Party, deputy speaker of the Estonian parliament, and minister of Social Affairs of Estonia. Since 2014 she is a Member of European Parliament, where she is involved as a rapporteur in the area of data protection and development of European digital economy and society.

Posted in Uncategorized

Submissions for #AoIR2017 Open

We are pleased to open submissions for proposals for #AoIR2017: Networked Publics to be held in Tartu, Estonia, 18 – 21 October, 2017. To re-familiarize yourself with the call for proposals and types of submissions solicited, please see here.

When submitting, please take the time to read the submission categories and topics carefully. In the interest of diversity and collegiality, each conference participant is limited to presenting one individual paper and one paper in a panel, and to participating in one roundtable. You can be a co-author on additional papers, but you must not be the scheduled presenter of these papers.

If you have any questions about the submission process, please email aoir2017 (at) aoir dot org. We look forward to seeing your proposals.
 
Click here to go to the submission site: https://www.conftool.com/aoir2017.
 
We look forward to your proposals and to a vibrant and stimulating conference in Tartu!

Posted in Conferences

#AoIR2016 – Your First AoIR Conference?

#AoIR2016 had 535 full conference attendees from 30 countries. This included 331 first time attendees! Each year AoIR welcomes many new researchers.

Take a peek at the CFP for #AoIR2017.  Will we meet you this October?

Posted in Uncategorized

Facebook’s accidental ‘death’ of users reminds us to plan for digital death

Facebook’s accidental ‘death’ of users reminds us to plan for digital death
(republished with permission from The Conversation.)

Tama Leaver, Curtin University

The accidental “death” of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and millions of other Facebook users is a timely reminder of what happens to our online content once we do pass away.

Earlier this month, Zuckerberg’s Facebook profile displayed a banner which read: “We hope the people who love Mark will find comfort in the things others share to remember and celebrate his life.” Similar banners populated profiles across the social network.

After a few hours of users finding family members, friends and themselves(!) unexpectedly declared dead, Facebook realised its widespread error. It resurrected those effected, and shelved the offending posthumous pronouncements.

For many of the 1.8-billion users of the popular social media platform, it was a powerful reminder that Facebook is an increasingly vast digital graveyard.

It’s also a reminder for all social media users to consider how they want their profiles, presences and photos managed after they pass away.

The legal uncertainty of digital assets

Your material goods are usually dealt with by an executor after you pass away.

But what about your digital assets – media profiles, photos, videos, messages and other media? Most national laws do not specifically address digital material.

As most social networks and online platforms are headquartered in the US, they tend to have “terms of use” which fiercely protect the rights of individual users, even after they have died.

Requests to access the accounts of deceased loved ones, even by their executors, are routinely denied on privacy grounds.

While most social networks, including Facebook, explicitly state you cannot let another person know or log in with your password, for a time leaving a list of your passwords for your executor seemed the only easy way to allow someone to clean up and curate your digital presence after death.

Five years ago, as the question of death on social media started to gain interest, this legal uncertainty led to an explosion of startups and services that offered solutions from storing passwords for loved ones, to leaving messages and material to be sent posthumously.

But as with so many startups, many of these services have stagnated or disappeared altogether.

Dealing with death

flickr photo by mkhmarketing shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-SA) license

Public tussles with grieving parents and loved ones over access to deceased accounts have led most big social media platforms to develop their own processes for dealing with digital death.

Facebook now allows users to designate a “legacy contact” who, after your death, can change certain elements of a memorialised account. This includes managing new friend requests, changing profile pictures and pinning a notification post about your death.

But neither a legacy contact, nor anyone else, can delete older material from your profile. That remains visible forever to whoever could see it before you die.

The only other option is to leave specific instructions for your legacy contact to delete your profile in its entirety.

Instagram, owned by Facebook, allows family members to request deletion or (by default) locks the account into a memorialised state. This respects existing privacy settings and prevents anyone logging into that account or changing it in the future.

Twitter will allow verified family members to request the deletion of a deceased person’s account. It will never allow anyone to access it posthumously.

LinkedIn is very similar to Twitter and also allows family members to request the deletion of an account.

Google’s approach to death is decidedly more complicated, with most posthumous options being managed by the not very well known Google Inactive Account Manager.

This tool allows a Google user assign the data from specific Google tools (such as Gmail, YouTube and Google Photos) to either be deleted or sent to a specific contact person after a specified period of “inactivity”.

The minimum period of inactivity that a user can assign is three months, with a warning one month before the specified actions take place.

But as anyone who has ever managed an estate would know, three months is an absurdly long time to wait to access important information, including essential documents that might be stored in Gmail or Google Drive.

If, like most people, the user did not have the Inactive Account Manager turned on, Google requires a court order issued in the United States before it will consider any other requests for data or deletion of a deceased person’s account.

Planning for your digital death

The advice (above) is for just a few of the more popular social media platforms. There are many more online places where people will have accounts and profiles that may also need to be dealt with after a person’s death.

Currently, the laws in Australia and globally have not kept pace with the rapid digitisation of assets, media and identities.

Just as it’s very difficult to legally pass on a Kindle library or iTunes music collection, the question of what happens to digital assets on social media is unclear to most people.

As platforms make tools available, it is important to take note and activate these where they meet (even partially) user needs.

Equally, wills and estates should have specific instructions about how digital material – photos, videos, messages, posts and memories – should ideally be managed.

With any luck the law will catch up by the time these wills get read.

The Conversation

Tama Leaver, Associate Professor in Internet Studies, Curtin University

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Posted in Uncategorized